Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Kids Born

Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Kids Born

 

 

We have had some new Nigerian Dwarf Dairy goat kids born 11 days ago.  This is from our new doe, Meg’s Mini Rachelle, and our new buck, Amasanti BB California Gold (aka Fred).

Amasanti BB California Gold (aka Fred)

I in particular was looking forward to this breeding with great anticipation because Rachelle is a Swiss marked Nigerian and I have never had one of those before.  Fred is a Gold and I haven’t had that one before either.  I have had a cream, possibly a gold but never in a buck.  Fred is from a buck recently imported from California and Rachelle is also from lines totally new to my herd. I researched the lines and have brought in some pretty goats but only after making sure they are from very milk producing lines.

Meg’s Mini Rachelle

I bought several new bucks this year and a few does as well.  The bucks specifically are from proven milk lines and should be of the quality that my does are.  In the past, I believe my bucks were more neutral when it came to milk production and now I have bucks that are as high or higher in milk production than my already high producing does.  I am hoping that it will breed my does, who are already high producers, up even farther.

My goal is to have my does and their daughters all be half gallon or 4 lb a day milkers or better….always.  I don’t want average milk production or low production that so many Nigerian breeders seem to think is standard.  I am not focused on only pretty faces or eye colors.  I have pretty faces and fabulous eyes but not at any expense in the milk pail.  Dashing colors and sparkling eyes do NOT put milk in the pail.  Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats are just that….DAIRY GOATS!

Rachelle’s Triplets

I have been a closed herd since moving back from Colorado to Michigan.  We did our testing and with the herd negative on their tests, it is now time to close the herd back up.

I have a few photos of these lovely little darlings.  We were lucky and right there when mama went into labor because she went EARLY! and she had triplets and if we had gone into the house even for that hour or so before coming back out to do evening chores, I have no doubts that we would have lost two of the kids.  She popped number 2 and 3 our in about 30 seconds total at once after having had kid 1 about 15 minutes prior.  She was a bit dazed, I would have been also with two kids popping out in 30 seconds, so she couldn’t react quick enough to get the sacks off their heads.  That left me with towels in hand to help her.  I was her labor and delivery nurse.  Kid 2 was the only doe in the lot.  1 and 3 are gorgeous bucks.

Kid 1 is a black and tan Swiss marked boy.  He was the smallest of them all.  I think he might have only been a pound and so tiny.  But he was strong and up and nursing about 3 minutes after she had his sack off before he was even dry.  And 11 days after, he is one of the bounciest of the three!

Willow meeting the boys for the first time

Kid 2 is the doe.  She appeared white.  But a couple of days ago, I realized she is not all white.  She is a Cou Blanc!!  I am so excited.  I have one Cou Blanc in my herd currently, but Sweet Pea is 13 years old and has never thrown a Cou Blanc herself.  This little darling is white head, white neck and white shoulder area and color on the rump.  I can see the distinct line mid back where a buck skin pattern would break except her color placements are the opposite of a buckskin.  Where a traditional Cou Blanc has white on front and black on rump, this little gal has white on front and pale gold on rump.  So I am guessing that Gold is her color family and Cou Blanc is her pattern.  She has the little gold strips in the same spots on her nose and face as Sweet Pea has her black strips.  The only thing that Sweet Pea has that this little one does not have is any gold strips visible yet on her legs.  Her legs currently just appear all white.  Oh and she doesn’t have Sweet Pea’s wattles.

So after three hours of unplanned goat midwifery, we returned to our normal lives….minus the hours lost playing with the new kids over the last 11 days.  but…..Aren’t they all just so cute?

 

Kizy, a LGD, Livestock Guardian Dog

Kizy, a LGD, Livestock Guardian Dog

 

 

Kizy ( ?- July 15, 2016)

 

We got Kizy, our Great Pyr, in 2009 while out in Colorado.  She was $50 off a Craig list ad.  We were her third and final home.  She has been a joy to have for years.

Kizy in Colorado

This huge puff ball of fur could have dragged me all over creation, but she was one of the most gentle dogs I have ever seen.  I attached my lead around my waist and put the other end on her collar and she would walk at my side with the lead limp.  She has always done that with me.

Don’t get me wrong…she was also stubborn as a mule!!  I remember one day when she was sitting on our two seat settee in the cabin in Colorado, and she was taking up the ENTIRE settee…I told her to get down.  She refused.  I tried to push her down and she sat up and growled at me.  I told her not to growl at me and pushed her again.  She took my entire arm in her mouth and closed with pressure.  She didn’t bite but she was telling me that she wasn’t moving.  I, on the other hand, told her that she WAS moving, threw her down, yelled at her and tossed her butt out of the cabin.  I didn’t speak to her for 2 solid weeks straight.  I acted as if she didn’t even exist.  She was crushed…..we talked at the end of the two weeks and it never happened again.  Even up to the day that we had to lay her to rest, if I spoke of that day, she hung her head because she remembered well.  But just to be clear, I did catch her on the new settee about a week or two before she passed.  She saw me coming and hopped down as fast as possible as if to say you didn’t see me do that.  So stubborn……

 

Kizy wearing mom’s dreadlock hat

After moving to MI, I fell a couple of times from the kitchen down the two steps into the living room.  The last time that happened, it was a complete fall, flat on my back, two steps down on the concrete.  I was in so much pain I had my eyes shut, and was yelling.  Charlie wanted to help me up but I said don’t move me.  I had to let that pain subside a bit before I could even open my eyes, let alone move.  When I was able to open my eyes, imagine my surprise to see Kizy’s concerned face about 1.5 inches from the end of my nose!!  I wrapped my arms around her and pulled myself up off the floor with her help.  I adore my border collies, but I could not have done that with one of them.

Kizy adored children.  Even small afraid ones.  Those were her favorites, and she was very gentle with them.  The cats also fascinated her, the smaller the cat the more interest.  It was her innate protection for anything small.  That is part of being a LGD, Livestock Guardian Dog.  She guarded our stock in CO even though she wasn’t bonded with stock like a LGD from birth.  She guarded in the pens that surrounded the small livestock pens.  She was a bit more bonded with humans than stock but since they were MY stock she guarded them with joy.

When Bj passed on in Colorado, I was heart broken and sitting in the barn yard.  Kizy came to me and I wrapped myself around her and her fur and just sobbed.  That happened a few years prior when Chaz’s Father passed and a few years before that when Chaz’s Mother passed.  Each of these passings was super hard on me and sobbing in the barnyard wrapped around Kizy hugging her was one of the few things that helped.  Every time one of those important people had passed, it worked out that Chaz was offshore.  So Kizy was my furry Chaz to help me through it all.

Kizy on the settee

After moving to MI, she retired to the house.  Our pens were not set up in a fashion that she could roam around them, and she was getting old.  We reckon she was about 3-3.5 years when we got her so at her passing last Friday, I do believe she was 10.5-11 years old.  She had greatly gone down hill in the last six months with her hind quarters not getting proper brain stimuli and this was causing her great pain and making it difficult for her to control her feet to stand or walk.  It was hard letting her go because even to the end she was worried about who would guard me.  We lost Rowan about a month ago and he was another LGD that has always fixated on guarding me.  She knows that Broch is the only LGD in the house left that guards me and he is only a year younger than her.  But I assured her that Broch would protect me as well as our border collie Cinnamon, who has stepped up and taken her mother Abbey’s place as pack leader and lead guard border collie.  Kizy saw the spot that was to be her final fur resting place and I asked her if she wanted me to plant flowers on her head like I did Abbey or on her heart like I did Rowan, and she laughed and said I could do what I wanted because she would just dig them up anyways.  Defiant and stubborn to the end!  You will be missed my darling puff ball….sniff.

A lot of passings…..Gracie and Rowan

A lot of passings…..Gracie and Rowan

I haven’t wrote for a while as there has been so many passings happening here on Alba Ranch that it feels overwhelming.  I know that loss is part of life and particularly of ranch and livestock life, but sometimes things just get you down.

On my birthday, April 13, I lost one of my Nigerian does.  I have had high hopes for this gal since the day she was born.  She was born first and was rather small but spunky.  Her sister was much larger and thrived, until things went wrong and we lost her at 4 months old.  So Gracie was still in my mind a lot.

Gracie as a kid with her mom and sister

She was a doeling off the only daughter I had from one of my best does.  I had worked with her mother for ages but she just would not work with me.  I sold her to one of my friends and she is as good as gold with her.  We all have preferences and I just was NOT hers!  I was greatly looking forward to little Gracie growing up and being a solid steady milker in my herd.  She was pregnant and went into labour on my birthday.  This was her first and ended up being her last.  She had one buckling that was huge and stuck.  We tried to help her pull it, the vet tried, we finally had to put her down after making certain there were no other kids stuck behind the first one.  That buckling was super huge and took up all the space and of course had passed during the trauma of this delivery.  I lost them both that day.  That was my first time losing animals like this and particularly with the Nigerian dwarf dairy goat breed.  In 10 years of having goats, I had never had to go or even try to go into the back side of a goat and help pull a kid.  My hands were too large for her and a friend had to help and with her small hands there was just no moving that stuck kid.

We have lost 2 of a set of triplets this year.  One at birth and another that was weaker around 4-5 days old.  I have heard others talk about this as common place but in my herd this is not common place and was hard to handle alone as Charlie was off shore working.

 

 

Rowan March 2006-May 13, 2016

 

My Rowan, big boy, mama’s boy, Roweeeeeena….these were a few of the nick names that Rowan had.  He came to us in 2006 out in Colorado with his brother and my first pair of dairy goats.  He has been a loyal buddy and although he would guard the goats when I asked him….he really preferred to guard me…MOM!

Rowan in his fav spot guarding mom

This last three years he has only guarded part time in the summers as he has never been able to tolerate the cold well.  And he had been full time retired this last year into the house. He started limping on his front shoulder a year ago and it would go away, come back, go away,…and repeat.  He seemed ok in between bouts of limping and there were no apparent wounds, injuries, swelling, sores or anything.  I wondered if he pulled muscles when romping out in the pen with the other dogs.  During the winter we added some pain killers to his daily routine to help with the pain as it was becoming more regular with the coming part and less of the going away part.  I knew that he was not getting better and we had to make the decision to let him go on May 13 as he just couldn’t walk without extreme pain and that was with pain killers.  His shoulder had finally swelled up and even with essential oils and lavender, the swelling was going down but the pain and limping was not. He had no other health issues but being the big Anatolian boy that he was, his not being able to walk was debilitating for him and impossible for me to help him due to his size.  He was ready to go and it was a smooth passing without incident other my my heart cracking.  I still remember the day when he was about 2 years old and had been barking all night long for approximately 9 months….yes I said 9 months..that I told my husband Rowan was not going to make it to his 2 year old birthday as I was going to strangle him.  I didn’t mean it..honest …..and I miss him dreadfully.

Blizzard Coming and Going

Blizzard Coming and Going

 

 

Today my heart is broke.

 

Blizzard (?-February 12, 2016)

My Blizzard died this morning at 5:30 am after a day and night of severe pain.  I know that it is better that she is gone and no longer in pain, but my heart is broke.  I hate losing an animal and know that they all have their “sell by dates” but when one goes and it isn’t an easy passing it tears at my heart even more.

Blizzard

Blizzard was a lovely border collie that we adopted in December 2006 while living out in Colorado.  Blizzard came to us that December and today it is a howling blizzard outside when she was leaving us.

She was a blue eyed double Merle border collie.  a Double Merle is a breeding done between parents that both carry the Merle gene.  There is a a 1 in 3 chance of the dog being Deaf, Blind and having genetic problems.  Blizzard was deaf and mostly blind.  This type of breeding should never be done but some breeders do it under the mistaken thought that they will get MORE Merle dogs to sell at a higher price.  We had adopted another double Merle Aussie with the same sort of problems.

She didn’t interact with people or with other dogs like a normal border collie and although it did take a long time, she did eventually bond with Charlie and I.  She was lost from her first family and was in a shelter.  I drove across Monarch Pass to the western slope to get her, meeting the shelter lady in Gunnison, CO. Blizzard and I drove back across Monarch Pass in my CJ7 Jeep that December.  It was one of my first long mountain trips to get an animal. Charlie and I had both seen her on different adoption ads at the same time and were emailing each other about her.

Blizzard

If the shelter was correct on her age, she was approximately 11 years old.  (She was with us for 9 years and 2 months.)  That would make her the YOUNGEST of my older dogs and I seriously did not see this coming.  We went into the vet on Monday because she had vomited on Saturday and wouldn’t eat anything that day.  She did eat a bit on Sunday but not like usual.  She looked bloated and was walking funny.  We found that her pancreas, gall bladder and liver were swollen.  Her blood work showed her pancreas and liver functions were not right but her gall bladder was fine.  She was also anemic.  We were treating her for pancreatitis and I had to change her diet.  She was getting cooked rice and chicken and had started to improve and was eating again.

 

Blizzard

Yesterday, I woke up and Blizzard wouldn’t take her pain meds that morning and refused to eat all day.  She did drink water but her bloated look which had started to decrease was back.  By bed time, she was starting to stagger because she appeared to be weak but still would not eat.  I called the vet and I was supposed to bring her into the vet at 7:30 am when they opened this morning, but she passed at 5:30 am.

My Darling Blizzard is gone and is already missed.

Goat Milking Machine and Antique Desk

Goat Milking Machine and Antique Desk

This weekend we finally got the milk machine put together.  I have been gathering photos, instructions, bits and pieces and all the various things we would need to do this.  There were a few problems with some of the bits so I had to go back to the hardware store several times to get ones that worked.

Hand made portable battery goat milk machine

But it is officially together and had suction on it just find inside.  Today I will be trying it outside to see how things go.  It achieves suction inside just against the palm of my hand so it will work with the teats.  I don’t know for certain if I need a smaller teat cup, so I have a couple of smaller ones ordered in case these are too big.  We used nylon washers and rubber washers on the underside of the lid so that there is NO big dollop of poxy crap that others have used and tote as “food safe” even though that horrid poxy is in the milk all the time.  We also don’t have any of the brass nuts inside either which the milk can corrode and cause toxic problems.

I stopped into a little antique shop last week, looking for an arm chair similar to the one that I used at A Sisters Act in Hart, MI on the UFO day.  I was spinning with my Majacraft Little Gem spinning wheel and liked the feel of the chair and position of my legs.  Recently, sitting on our couch even with the pillows and such behind my back to give me extra support and get me out of the back of the deep couch, has been causing pain.  After spinning for several hours at A Sisters Act, I thought to try to find a chair similar to the chair there.  It was one from the grandmother of the lady there brought over from Europe so there would be no buying that specific chair.

Birdseye Maple Antique Writing desk

I did not find a chair, but my eye was caught the instant I walked through the door by a lovely Birdseye Maple antique writing desk.  I went back later that day with Charlie to show him but they were already closed up for the day.  I did manage to find a phone number and talked with the shop owner and arranged a time to go see it the following day.  We were not sure going there but did come home with the desk.

Charlie had to fix the chains which had been put into new holes in the incorrect location so the fold down desk part wouldn’t sit properly.  He wood filled the current holes, fixed the old ones and a few days later attached the support chains correctly.  Cleaned up and ready to use.  We will need to find a new set of castors for it as the original ones are in the drawer but not in good shape at all.

Birdseye Maple Antique Writing Desk

I still haven’t found my chair, but the next time I am in Hart at A Sisters Act, I will stop and get a photo of it so that it will be easier to find one for my own spinning at home.

Final Stone Projects for 2015

Final Stone Projects for 2015

2015 has been a year doing a lot of out door projects.  Some stone, some planting, some gardening, some tree clearing, and a lot of general clean up as there has been a lot of junk on the property prior to us purchasing here.   The stone projects are numerous and seem to be ever growing as my creative mind gets loose and the property starts to take shape.  The Stones tell us where they want to be, so as we clear and tidy things up, it will become clear where they will end up eventually.

 

Stones waiting for placement next year
Field Stone Retaining embankment

We are clearing a small area that already has a merry go round and swing and have dubbed it “the park”.  We do plan on having a fire pit area and setting a lot of standing and recumbent stones for a stone circle and sacred place.

 

I have been working more on my garden area as the three stone raised beds that I planted this year yielded a large crop and even today on December 31, 2015 with snow and ice outside, still has Kale, onions, beets and some Rainbow Swiss Chard in it.  Many of my herbs are still growing, although I have lost my chives, basil, tarragon, and one of my more delicate thyme plants.

 

Dry stack raised stone beds and walk ways

I built three more dry stacked raised stone beds and did some path and walk ways around it in stones and gravel.  We did line those areas with some plastic underneath and used a deep bed of pea gravel because the soil is fertile and the weeds seem to run wild.

This will allow me to plant up a lot more vegetables for my family to grow our own food.  I have been trying to buy organic produce as much as I can, but there isn’t always a large selection in the area as well as the quality isn’t always the best.  I find eating the non organic produce and fruit a risk all the time.  Some is covered more in pesticides than others and I get sick or slightly sick depending on how much is on it.  I can’t wait until our fruit trees and vegetable garden is productive enough that I can grow our own food.  I have a lot to learn in how to do gardening successfully, how to control pests naturally, and how to preserve and can the food once I do get it grown.

Sea berry walk ways

I also did a section of two walk ways between the sea berries and most of the beds that are flower and ornamental around the property were lined with field stones to give a definite edge that was still organic.  It certainly helps when mowing and striming to know where to STOP when approaching the flower beds.

I was the only one that knew exactly where things were in all the beds and I still managed to strim off the heads of several of my lilies.  Although Charlie says that is due to me being “dangerous” with the strimmer!  I mean really, me???

Walk ways and curbed beds

Overall, I do believe the look is coming together.  I recently had someone asking me if I was going for a “show garden”.  BWWWhhhhaaaa, again….ME?  NOT!  It will never be a show garden as I hate weeding way too much for that.

I did hand pick out almost all these rocks and transported the bulk of them to the ranch myself.  I did have a few loads brought of large rocks and boulders, and also some loads of the field stone.  This is an on going project that will take a fair amount of years to complete.

I have the ideas in my head but have had a lot of help executing them with several local workers and Charlie helping out.  Charlie and I did place the paving and stones mostly ourselves but a lot of the prep work was helped with from others.  I have had several folks ask my how long it took me to build the three raised dry stack stone beds.  I usually respond that “We will not discuss that”.  It was not easy, I had to tear down most of what was there and re build it several times and I honestly don’t know if they will stay standing up.  Dry stacking stone walls is fun, difficult, beautiful, an art form and something I am uncertain if I ever wish to try again.  It sounds a lot easier in the books I read before attempting it.  Isn’t that how it goes?

Stone beds

The edgings all lined with rocks serves several purposes.  The rocks give a definite edge to the beds, they keep the weeds down and stop the advancement of the grass, it is organic and looks great, as well as it surrounds everything with lovely stone and rock energy.  It doesn’t hurt either that is just LOOKS cool!

Two go and One arrives- Tessa Jane, Domino, Llama cria

Two go and One arrives- Tessa Jane, Domino, Llama cria

Tuesday, September 22, 2015 was a sad day and a not so sad day.

 

Tessa Jane (December 31, 1999- September 22, 2015)

 

 

Tessa as a pup

Tessa was my first Border Collie ever.  Charlie and I had been married about 2 months and he had to go offshore for his very first trip offshore after we were married.  Being on my own was no big deal, however it was a bit different being that I was in Scotland and knew next to no one.  He was only gone for about five days that I recall but I got Tessa during that time.  She was just 8 weeks old.

Hector, Charlie’s Da, holding his Tessa

 

My sister Jessica came to visit later on when Tessa was a bit more grown and gave her the middle name of Jane, and Tessa Jane she was forever after know as.  Tessa was a blue smooth border collie.  She had blue eyes until she was about 5 months old when they finally settled to the darker color that they were the rest of her life.  We never got our next border collie, Abbey, until Tessa was 18 months old.  So she had Charlie and I all to herself for that time.

Hector, Charlie’s Da, adored Tessa.  He never really forgave us when we got Abbey our second border collie until we got our third border collie, Prue.  Than it was not so much that he forgave us, but that he gave us for lost.  Apparently we were crazy.  Charlie never figured out why he was so stand offish with Abbey until he saw a photo of Teddy, Hector’s child hood Border collie.  Abbey was the image of Hector’s Teddy.  Abbey of course is an intelligent border collie so she eventually won Hector over by bonding with him watching Aberdeen and Celtic footie game.  We had made a VCR tape for Abbey of bits of the game and bits of Animal Planet and she and Hector watched that tape for hours together.  The TV would be off and Abbey would find Hector in the sitting room.  She would go and sit pretty in front of the TV.  Pause and wait.  Turn and look at Hector.  Turn and look at the TV and repeat until he turned on the TV and popped her tape in.  Abbey trained Hector to turn on her tape and all was well between them.

Tessa at Aden Park, Mintlaw Scotland

 

Tessa never did watch Footie with Hector and Abbey.  She did have Hector wrapped around her paw equally but in a different area.  Tessa was afraid of heights, specifically bridges and horribly so with bridges she could see through.  When she stayed with Hector, they went for walks daily.  Upon coming to a bridge in Buckie on their walk, Hector would pick her up and carry her across so her paws didn’t have to touch that scary old bridge at all.

Charlie and I took Tessa frequently to Aden Park for walks and outings.  Aden Park is a stunning location in Mintlaw, Scotland.

She always enjoyed meeting new dogs and the bigger and stranger they were the more that she wanted to play with them.  We walked at the beach in Peterhead, Scotland or down at the dunes frequently.  Tessa never seemed to have much interest in small dogs, but those great big snarly boisterous tough dogs had her attention from first woof!

Rolling in dead seagulls was another favorite pastime of hers as well as drinking the sea water in order to throw up all the way home in the car.  You will be missed Tessa Jane.  She had reached 15.75 years old.  A ripe old age for a Scottish Border Collie.

 

Domino (? – September  22, 2015)

Domino was a double merle Australian Shepherd, Aussie.  We adopted him in summer of 2006 but I first heard of him December 2005 where he had been dumped by his previous owner into a kill shelter in California.

Domino, on the Colorado Ranch

I called the shelter from Scotland and they said the owner stated Domino was 7.5 years old.  He was adopted and returned the next day and later adopted by an Aussie rescue agency.  The agency foster homed him for about 6 months and we got him after moving back to the states summer of 2006.

 

Domino

Domino was with our family for a little over 9 years.  We know that he was probably at least 4 years old by the time that we got him but don’t know if he was really as old as 7.5 years.  Either way, he wasn’t a spring chicken when we let him go.

A double merle is a breeding that should never be done.  It breeds a merle to another merle in the mistaken hope that they will get a litter of all merle pups.  Usually this is done to try to get more money as Merle pups are in higher demand due to the public liking the color and pattern.  The problem with this is that you don’t necessarily get more merle pups in the litter.  You do have a 1 in 3 chance of getting a deaf pup that may also be blind and have a lot of other genetic mutations and abnormalities.  Domino was mostly blind and he was deaf.  Towards the end we had to do eye drops for him every day for over a year.  One morning he had woke up with his blue eye all yellow orange because it was bleeding inside the eye and I couldn’t even see the blue any longer.  Once we got the swelling down and the bleeding stopped after a few months, we did eye drops for maintenance to try to stop that every happening again. This was some of his genetic problems due to being a double merle.  One of his eyes was smaller than the other, had very little color and was his mostly blind eye.

 

Domino was all bull moose!  His idea of fun and play was to run over the border collies and he loved a good tussle.  He loved being outside as well as inside by the fire on a cold wintery day.  Oddly enough, Domino and I didn’t get on as much as I had hoped.  We did have an understanding and got on most times, but he decided from the off that he was Charlie’s dog. He loved Charlie through and through.

He sat many times next to Charlie and would drape his front paw over Charlie’s hand and just rest it there.  Or he draped his front paw over Charlie’s ankle if Charlie’s feet were up on the settee.  He was happy and content to just sit there with his paw draped over Charlie as if he was holding hands and that was all that he required.  Now if Charlie wanted to pet him, hold him tight in a death lock and love on him….who was Domino to ever say no.

Domino and I had quiet moments where he draped his paw over me as well when we were alone.  With no one around, I could give him a little treat and he took it from me ever so gentle.  I was always amazed at how white he was in color and how soft his fur was…superbly soft.  Many folks have bought some of Domino’s fiber to spin in their projects.

Domino you are missed and now you are free from pain.  Whatever age you were, you had a full and long life.

 

One Arrives (September 22, 2015)

I did say that we had two that left us Tuesday and one arrived.  During the time that Charlie and I were letting Tessa and Domino go and burying them in the pet cemetery with our other dogs, we had a new arrival here on the ranch.

Glenda, our black llama mama, had an all black male cria.  He is ever so long legged and scrawny looking.  But look at all those curls stop those stilts for legs.  Baby is doing well so far and up and moving around this weekend.

Glenda seems to be settling into motherhood as this was her second cria.  She lost her first cria in CO a few years ago due to a dog interference.  We were unsure if she would bond with this baby after her last traumatic experience but she has done well.

We still have a few llamas that we believe are pregnant but with no idea of their breeding date we won’t know when the crias will arrive until they are here.  The first cria lived for 10 days and that all happened while Charlie was offshore.  This is the first llama we have ever had born that Charlie was able to see.

Cria baby with mom and another llama

Two left and One arrived.  What a surprise that made a very sad day just a little bit better.